Books · Shelf Control

Shelf Control #19

Hello friends and fellow book lovers! It’s Wednesday on my blog and that means: It’s time for another Shelf Control post. Sadly, it’s the last of my June posts but I’ll be back next month, of course. 🙂

If you’ve read my posts this month, you’ll know I’m spotlighting my unread books with characters or authors on the LGBTQIA spectrum. Here is what Shelf Control is and the rules: Shelf Control is a weekly celebration of the unread books on our shelves. Pick a book you own but haven’t read, write a post about it (suggestions: include what it’s about, why you want to read it, and when you got it), and link up! For more info on what Shelf Control is all about, check out my introductory post, here.

RULES

  • Write a blog post about a book that you own that you haven’t read yet.
  • Add your link in the comments!
  • If you’d be so kind, I’d appreciate a link back from your own post.
  • Check out other posts, and…have fun 🙂

Noteworthy by Riley Redgate

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Published: 2017 // Length: 400 pages

Jordan Sun is embarking on her junior year at the Kensington-Blaine Boarding School for the Performing Arts, hopeful that this will be her time: the year she finally gets cast in the school musical. But when her low Alto 2 voice gets her shut out for the third straight year—threatening her future at Kensington-Blaine and jeopardizing her college applications—she’s forced to consider nontraditional options.

In Jordan’s case, really nontraditional. A spot has opened up in the Sharpshooters, Kensington’s elite a cappella octet. Worshipped…revered…all male. Desperate to prove herself, Jordan auditions in her most convincing drag, and it turns out that Jordan Sun, Tenor 1, is exactly what the Sharps are looking for.

Jordan finds herself enmeshed in a precarious juggling act: making friends, alienating friends, crushing on a guy, crushing on a girl, and navigating decades-old rivalries. With her secret growing heavier every day, Jordan pushes beyond gender norms to confront what it means to be a girl (and a guy) in a male-dominated society, and—most importantly—what it means to be herself.


Why I want to read NoteworthyIf you saw my June TBR, you’ll notice I put Seven Ways To Lie by Riley Redgate on it. Since then, I’ve been thinking about her other release so I knew I had to feature it. Unlike my previous entries though, I have this one on hold at the library.

Does it still count if I feature it on Shelf Control? I digress, but this book sounds like it’s going to be heavy while still being fun. I can’t wait to see how the book tackles sexuality and relationships and friendships. Gah, I’m just so excited to read it already!

Have you read Noteworthy?

 

Books · Shelf Control

Shelf Control #18

Hello friends and fellow book lovers! I can’t believe it’s almost the end of June and I’m a month closer to seeing my boyfriend. Anyways, that’s not what you’re here for, you’re here for my Shelf Control post.

Similar to the last 2 weeks, I’ll be focusing on a book featuring a character on the LGBTQIA spectrum or an author who is on the spectrum. Here is what Shelf Control is and the rules: Shelf Control is a weekly celebration of the unread books on our shelves. Pick a book you own but haven’t read, write a post about it (suggestions: include what it’s about, why you want to read it, and when you got it), and link up! For more info on what Shelf Control is all about, check out my introductory post, here.

RULES

  • Write a blog post about a book that you own that you haven’t read yet.
  • Add your link in the comments!
  • If you’d be so kind, I’d appreciate a link back from your own post.
  • Check out other posts, and…have fun 🙂

People Like Us by Dana M. Mele

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Published: 2018 // Length: 384 pages

Kay Donovan may have skeletons in her closet, but the past is past, and she’s reinvented herself entirely. Now she’s a star soccer player whose group of gorgeous friends run their private school with effortless popularity and acerbic wit. But when a girl’s body is found in the lake, Kay’s carefully constructed life begins to topple.

The dead girl has left Kay a computer-coded scavenger hunt, which, as it unravels, begins to implicate suspect after suspect, until Kay herself is in the crosshairs of a murder investigation. But if Kay’s finally backed into a corner, she’ll do what it takes to survive. Because at Bates Academy, the truth is something you make…not something that happened.


Why I want to read People Like Us: I have this in ebook format and it only makes me want a Kindle even more. Anyways, I want to read this book because I’ve heard fellow bloggers rave about it. I also think it’s a boarding school setting along with some f/f romance, female friendship and a mystery.

Even though I haven’t read it yet, it sounds like it could be an incredible movie!

Have you read People Like Us?

 

Books · Shelf Control

Shelf Control #17

Hello friends and fellow book lovers! It’s another wonderful Wednesday or at least, I hope you’re having a good one! Anyways, that means it’s time for another Shelf Control post. Much like last week, I’ll be featuring a book written by an author who is on the LGBTQIA or has a character on the spectrum. 🙂

Here is what Shelf Control is and the rules: Shelf Control is a weekly celebration of the unread books on our shelves. Pick a book you own but haven’t read, write a post about it (suggestions: include what it’s about, why you want to read it, and when you got it), and link up! For more info on what Shelf Control is all about, check out my introductory post, here.

RULES

  • Write a blog post about a book that you own that you haven’t read yet.
  • Add your link in the comments!
  • If you’d be so kind, I’d appreciate a link back from your own post.
  • Check out other posts, and…have fun 🙂

The Backstagers Vol 1 by James Tynion IV/Illustrated by Rian Sygh

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Published: 2017 // Length: 112 pages

When Jory transfers to an all-boys private high school, he’s taken in by the only ones who don’t treat him like a new kid, the lowly stage crew known as the Backstagers. Not only does he gain great, lifetime friends, Jory is also introduced to an entire magical world that lives beyond the curtain. With the unpredictable twists and turns of the underground world, the Backstagers venture into the unknown, determined to put together the best play their high school has ever seen. 

James Tynion IV (Detective Comics, The Woods) teams up with artist Rian Sygh (Munchkin, Stolen Forest) for an incredibly earnest story that explores what it means to find a place to fit in when you’re kinda an outcast.


Why I want to read The Backstagers Vol 1: Once again, the queen of graphic novel recommendations Ali @HardbackHoarder talked about this. I don’t know how, but she always has the best graphic novel recommendations.

Anyways, she talked about how cool this graphic novel was so I was sold. Since it’s set in an all-boys school, I’m sure there’s bound to be some m/m romance, m/m friendship, and musical theater. Probably some magical elements too so I’m just plain excited!

Have you read The Backstagers Vol 1?

 

Books · Shelf Control

Shelf Control #16

Hello friends and fellow book lovers! Hopefully, you’re having a lovely morning or afternoon or evening. It’s Wednesday and that means: It’s time for another Shelf Control post. These are easily becoming some of my favorite posts to write 🙂

Similar to previous months, I’m theming my Shelf Control posts this month. Since it’s Pride Month, all the books will either feature a book with characters on the lgbtqia+ spectrum or authors who are LGBTQIA!

Here is what Shelf Control is and the rules: Shelf Control is a weekly celebration of the unread books on our shelves. Pick a book you own but haven’t read, write a post about it (suggestions: include what it’s about, why you want to read it, and when you got it), and link up! For more info on what Shelf Control is all about, check out my introductory post, here.

RULES

  • Write a blog post about a book that you own that you haven’t read yet.
  • Add your link in the comments!
  • If you’d be so kind, I’d appreciate a link back from your own post.
  • Check out other posts, and…have fun 🙂

The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily M. Danforth

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Published: 2012 // Length: 470 pages

When Cameron Post’s parents die suddenly in a car crash, her shocking first thought is relief. Relief they’ll never know that, hours earlier, she had been kissing a girl.

But that relief doesn’t last, and Cam is soon forced to move in with her conservative aunt Ruth and her well-intentioned but hopelessly old-fashioned grandmother. She knows that from this point on, her life will forever be different. Survival in Miles City, Montana, means blending in and leaving well enough alone (as her grandmother might say), and Cam becomes an expert at both.

Then Coley Taylor moves to town. Beautiful, pickup-driving Coley is a perfect cowgirl with the perfect boyfriend to match. She and Cam forge an unexpected and intense friendship — one that seems to leave room for something more to emerge. But just as that starts to seem like a real possibility, ultrareligious Aunt Ruth takes drastic action to ‘fix’ her niece, bringing Cam face-to-face with the cost of denying her true self — even if she’s not exactly sure who that is.


Why I want to read The Miseducation of Cameron Post: Usually when people recommend lesbian books, this one always comes up. I’ve heard booktubers rave about it and it was published in 2012, years and years before #ownvoices even began. I’m anxious to see if it lives up to the hype and if it’ll become one of my new favorite f/f books.

Have you read The Miseducation of Cameron Post?

 

Books · Shelf Control

Shelf Control #15

Hello friends and fellow book lovers! Welcome to another lovely Wednesday on bookishlyrebecca. Obviously, since it’s Wednesday, it’s time for another Shelf Control, my last of May. I’ve saved my most anticipated mental health read for this week!

Here is what Shelf Control is and the rules: Shelf Control is a weekly celebration of the unread books on our shelves. Pick a book you own but haven’t read, write a post about it (suggestions: include what it’s about, why you want to read it, and when you got it), and link up! For more info on what Shelf Control is all about, check out my introductory post, here.

Rules

  • Write a blog post about a book that you own that you haven’t read yet.
  • Add your link in the comments!
  • If you’d be so kind, I’d appreciate a link back from your own post.
  • Check out other posts, and…have fun 🙂

Girl Against The Universe by Paula Stokes

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Published: 2016 // Length: 400 pages

From the author of The Art of Lainey and Liars, Inc. comes a fresh, contemporary story about a girl coping with PTSD and the boy who wants to help her move on from the past.

Sixteen-year-old Maguire knows the universe is against her. No matter how many charms she buys off the internet or good luck rituals she performs each morning, horrible things happen when she’s around. Like that time the roller coaster jumped off its tracks. Or the time the house next door caught on fire. Or the time her brother, father, and uncle were all killed in a car crash–and Maguire walked away with barely a scratch. 

Despite what her therapist tells her, Maguire thinks it’s best to hide out in her room, far away from anyone she might accidentally hurt. But then she meets Jordy, an aspiring tennis star who wants to help her break her unlucky streak. Maguire knows that the best thing she can do for him is to stay away, but it turns out staying away might be harder than she thought.


Why I want to read Girl Against The Universe: Basically a whole bunch of reasons, but let’s get into the main one. There aren’t a lot of female athletes featured in YA and it’s frustrating. Well, women’s sports are generally ignored as whole but that’s a story for another post.

Anyways, I love the idea of following a female athlete who is struggling with PTSD and I think anxiety. Maybe not, but sports is one area where mental health is rarely discussed or even brought up. Lately, players and coaches have tried to change the conversation, but having fictionalized stories like this will only help.

I give Stokes major props for writing about such an underrepresented topic. I just can’t wait to read this book already!

Have you read Girl Against The Universe?

 

Books · Shelf Control

Shelf Control #14

Hello friends and fellow book lovers! It’s Wednesday and it’s also hump day and also Shelf Control day. Like the rest of the month, I’ll be spotlight a book I own or want to read with a focus on mental health.

Here is what Shelf Control is and the rules: Shelf Control is a weekly celebration of the unread books on our shelves. Pick a book you own but haven’t read, write a post about it (suggestions: include what it’s about, why you want to read it, and when you got it), and link up! For more info on what Shelf Control is all about, check out my introductory post, here.

Rules

  • Write a blog post about a book that you own that you haven’t read yet.
  • Add your link in the comments!
  • If you’d be so kind, I’d appreciate a link back from your own post.
  • Check out other posts, and…have fun 🙂

This Song Will Save Your Life by Leila Sales

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Published: 2013 // Length: 276 pages

Making friends has never been Elise Dembowski’s strong suit. All throughout her life, she’s been the butt of every joke and the outsider in every conversation. When a final attempt at popularity fails, Elise nearly gives up. Then she stumbles upon a warehouse party where she meets Vicky, a girl in a band who accepts her; Char, a cute, yet mysterious disc jockey; Pippa, a carefree spirit from England; and most importantly, a love for DJing.

Told in a refreshingly genuine and laugh-out-loud funny voice, This Song Will Save Your Life is an exuberant novel about identity, friendship, and the power of music to bring people together.


Why I want to read This Song Will Save Your LifeSurprisingly this is a book I do have! Yay for actually owning a book I’m talking about lol. Anyways, this book has been recommended and mentioned many times by emmmabooks as I’m sure most of you know.

At first, I didn’t know it was a book about mental health. I should have guessed, but it seems interesting. Music and songs have helped me get out of a depression and are such an incredible source of comfort. I can’t wait to see how mental health and music have a connection in this book.

Overall, this book just sounds like something I’d really enjoy. It’s sad I haven’t had the desire to pick it up yet. Heck, maybe I’ll do a shelf control monthly TBR someday!

Have you read This Song Will Save Your Life?

 

Books · Shelf Control

Shelf Control #13

Hello friends and fellow book lovers! It’s another hopefully lovely Wednesday and I’m here with my Shelf Control post. Once again, I’m going to spotlight a book I want to read focused on mental health for Mental Health Awareness Month. 🙂

Here is what Shelf Control is and the rules: Shelf Control is a weekly celebration of the unread books on our shelves. Pick a book you own but haven’t read, write a post about it (suggestions: include what it’s about, why you want to read it, and when you got it), and link up! For more info on what Shelf Control is all about, check out my introductory post, here.

RULES

  • Write a blog post about a book that you own that you haven’t read yet.
  • Add your link in the comments!
  • If you’d be so kind, I’d appreciate a link back from your own post.
  • Check out other posts, and…have fun 🙂

Every Last Word by Tamara Ireland Stone

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Published: 2015 // Length: 368 pages

Samantha McAllister looks just like the rest of the popular girls in her junior class. But hidden beneath the straightened hair and expertly applied makeup is a secret that her friends would never understand: Sam has Purely-Obsessional OCD and is consumed by a stream of dark thoughts and worries that she can’t turn off.

Second-guessing every move, thought, and word makes daily life a struggle, and it doesn’t help that her lifelong friends will turn toxic at the first sign of a wrong outfit, wrong lunch, or wrong crush. Yet Sam knows she’d be truly crazy to leave the protection of the most popular girls in school. So when Sam meets Caroline, she has to keep her new friend with a refreshing sense of humor and no style a secret, right up there with Sam’s weekly visits to her psychiatrist.

Caroline introduces Sam to Poet’s Corner, a hidden room and a tight-knit group of misfits who have been ignored by the school at large. Sam is drawn to them immediately, especially a guitar-playing guy with a talent for verse, and starts to discover a whole new side of herself. Slowly, she begins to feel more “normal” than she ever has as part of the popular crowd . . . until she finds a new reason to question her sanity and all she holds dear. 


Why I want to read Every Last Word: I didn’t realize this book focused on mental health at first. Obviously, after I read the description, I figured it out. Regardless, I haven’t read many books featuring OCD so it’d bring some diversity into my reading.

Like I mentioned in one of my previous posts, I love stories about “popular girls” who don’t have it all. I know they get such a stigma in school and the media, but their lives aren’t perfect.

Have you read Every Last Word?

 

Books · Shelf Control

Shelf Control #12

Hello friends and fellow book lovers! It’s another lovely Wednesday and I’m back with another Shelf Control. Similar to last week, I’m including a book featuring mental health and I’m so excited for this week’s pick. Let’s get into it 🙂

Before I get into the rules, here’s a brief idea of what this meme is. I’m just going to copy or paste what she shares before each post: Shelf Control is a weekly celebration of the unread books on our shelves. Pick a book you own but haven’t read, write a post about it (suggestions: include what it’s about, why you want to read it, and when you got it), and link up! For more info on what Shelf Control is all about, check out my introductory post, here.

RULES

  • Write a blog post about a book that you own that you haven’t read yet.
  • Add your link in the comments!
  • If you’d be so kind, I’d appreciate a link back from your own post.
  • Check out other posts, and…have fun 🙂

We Are Never Meeting In Real Life by Samantha Irby

We Are Never Meeting In Real Life

Published: 2017 // Length: 288 pages

Sometimes you just have to laugh, even when life is a dumpster fire. With We Are Never Meeting in Real Life., “bitches gotta eat” blogger and comedian Samantha Irby turns the serio-comic essay into an art form. Whether talking about how her difficult childhood has led to a problem in making “adult” budgets, explaining why she should be the new Bachelorette–she’s “35-ish, but could easily pass for 60-something”–detailing a disastrous pilgrimage-slash-romantic-vacation to Nashville to scatter her estranged father’s ashes, sharing awkward sexual encounters, or dispensing advice on how to navigate friendships with former drinking buddies who are now suburban moms–hang in there for the Costco loot–she’s as deft at poking fun at the ghosts of her past self as she is at capturing powerful emotional truths.


Why I want to read We Are Never Meeting In Real LifeThe main reason I want to read this is that it was featured in Joce’s book club. She focuses on woc authors and I trust her opinion on most books.

Considering this book has a focus on mental health and its cover, I knew I had to pick it up. Roxane Gay also left a review on Goodreads so that’s basically screaming for me to read it already!

Have you read We Are Never Meeting in Real Life?

 

Books · Shelf Control

Shelf Control #11

Hello friends and fellow book lovers! It’s Wednesday and you know what that means? It’s time for another Shelf Control post. Last month, I included first books in series I want to read. Since I loved that idea so much, I’m going to continue to do themed months.

When I looked up May, it’s known as Mental Health Awareness month. I didn’t know that, but it gives me a great idea. Throughout the month of May, I’ll be featuring books I want to read or book on my shelf with a focus on mental health.

Before I get into the rules, here’s a brief idea of what this meme is. I’m just going to copy or paste what she shares before each post: Shelf Control is a weekly celebration of the unread books on our shelves. Pick a book you own but haven’t read, write a post about it (suggestions: include what it’s about, why you want to read it, and when you got it), and link up! For more info on what Shelf Control is all about, check out my introductory post, here.

RULES

  • Write a blog post about a book that you own that you haven’t read yet.
  • Add your link in the comments!
  • If you’d be so kind, I’d appreciate a link back from your own post.
  • Check out other posts, and…have fun 🙂

Cracked Up To Be by Courtney Summers

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When “Perfect” Parker Fadley starts drinking at school and failing her classes, all of St. Peter’s High goes on alert. How has the cheerleading captain, girlfriend of the most popular guy in school, consummate teacher’s pet, and future valedictorian fallen so far from grace?

Parker doesn’t want to talk about it. She’d just like to be left alone, to disappear, to be ignored. But her parents have placed her on suicide watch and her counselors are demanding the truth. Worse, there’s a nice guy falling in love with her and he’s making her feel things again when she’d really rather not be feeling anything at all.

Nobody would have guessed she’d turn out like this. But nobody knows the truth.

Something horrible has happened, and it just might be her fault.


I’m going to get rid of the when/how I got the book but instead why I want to read it.

Why I want to read Cracked Up To Be: I’ve never read anything by Courtney Summers, but I’ve heard such great things. From what I’ve heard, she’s known for talking about feminism and mental health. Two topics I enjoy talking about!

I know most books focus on popular “students” who are perfect and wonderful. I can’t wait to see one where it’s the opposite. I had no idea this book featured mental health so I’m excited to see how it discusses mental health.

Have you read Cracked Up To Be?

 

Books · Shelf Control

Shelf Control #10

Hello friends and fellow book lovers! It’s the last Wednesday of April and I still can’t believe the month is almost over. For my last April Shelf Control post, I’m going to focus on another start to a series I have yet to read.

I’m especially excited to feature this series and I can’t wait to finally pick it up. Here is what Shelf Control is and the rules: Shelf Control is a weekly celebration of the unread books on our shelves. Pick a book you own but haven’t read, write a post about it (suggestions: include what it’s about, why you want to read it, and when you got it), and link up! For more info on what Shelf Control is all about, check out my introductory post, here.

Rules

  • Write a blog post about a book that you own that you haven’t read yet.
  • Add your link in the comments!
  • If you’d be so kind, I’d appreciate a link back from your own post.
  • Check out other posts, and…have fun 🙂

Cinder by Marissa Meyer

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Published: 2012 // Length: 400 pages

A forbidden romance.

A deadly plague.

Earth’s fate hinges on one girl . . .

CINDER, a gifted mechanic in New Beijing, is also a cyborg. She’s reviled by her stepmother and blamed for her stepsister’s sudden illness. But when her life becomes entwined with the handsome Prince Kai’s, she finds herself at the centre of a violent struggle between the desires of an evil queen – and a dangerous temptation.

Cinder is caught between duty and freedom, loyalty and betrayal. Now she must uncover secrets about her mysterious past in order to protect Earth’s future.

This is not the fairytale you remember. But it’s one you won’t forget.


How and When I Got It: Once again, I don’t really recall where this book came from. I know it’s been forever since I’ve gotten it, though. Since I haven’t read for years, I have a lot of series to catch up on.

Why I want to read it: I surprisingly didn’t hear about The Lunar Chronicles from Booktube but from a Disney Youtuber. She talked about how it was an awesome retelling and I trust her opinion on most things.

Obviously, I heard fellow bloggers and booktubers rave about it too. It’s also a widely beloved retelling too and I enjoy retellings. I know it’s a longer series so it’s better to get started early.

Have you read Cinder? Would you recommend it?